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LAB READS

Our eyes are one of the greatest areas of concern as our skin changes with age. Sagging, hallowing, fine lines, wrinkles, and dark circles are common aesthetic problems that men and women seek to address, but they are notoriously difficult to treat with topical products.
Our skin serves as the first line of defense between us and insults from the outside world. Although we do our best to protect our skin and its microbiome by using sunscreen, clean beauty products, eating a diet rich in micronutrients, and staying hydrated, skin redness may still occur.
The use of oils in skin care is widely misunderstood. Many people equate all oils to the sebum produced naturally by the skin, which is often scapegoated as a direct cause of acne. However, oils are a vast category of substances with an array of properties – many of which can benefit the skin care routines of individuals of all skin types.
Lip care is just as important as caring for the rest of your skin. However, your lips have specific needs that require more than just your usual skincare products. Anatomical differences between the skin of your lips and the skin elsewhere on your face and body make them more susceptible to dryness and peeling.
Studies of the skin microbiome that exist on and within the human body is a fairly recent field, though holds potential to revolutionize the way we think about our health and immune systems. The skin microbiome is defined as the microorganisms (or microbiota), such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses, which occupy the skin's environment.
Most of us already know that sunscreen is likely the most important step in our daily skincare routine to protect us from harmful UVA and UVB radiation that damages the deep layers of our skin cells. However, these days the big debate lies in what kind of sunscreen is best to use. 
Many times we think that glowing skin comes solely from the products we use. The reality is that our skin responds to what’s going on inside our bodies. The more we eat foods that are rich in healthy fats, antioxidants, vitamins, collagen, and amino acids, the better our skin will look and feel.
Acids. The word itself sounds scary when you think of it as something you apply to your skin. It engenders fear, although it doesn’t need to. So let’s demystify acids as they relate to skincare.
There’s a lot of talk about vitamin C being the ingredient above all ingredients when it comes to skincare. So, is it really that good? What is it, what are the benefits, and how should you be using it?
One thing that’s true about beauty is that self-care is important. There’s no denying that when we prioritize our health, our bodies, and our skin we fuel the mental and physical energy that sets the other aspects of our life up for success.

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